Psychiatry and
Behavioral Sciences

Postdoctoral Research Training Fellowships in
Clinical Psychiatry and Psychology

PROGRAM DESCRIPTION

This clinical research training program funded by the National Institute of Mental Health is designed for those who plan to pursue careers in clinical research with a specialization in adult disorders including mood, anxiety, eating disorders, and related areas such as insomnia. These are two-year positions contingent upon funding. Fellows will participate in research projects together with faculty mentors and are expected to develop their own investigations. Candidates should have a clearly identified area of interest and a demonstrated capability in scholarly research.

The core aspect of the program is the mentoring relationship leading to the development of an investigation that will eventually establish a program of research. In addition the following didactic courses are offered.

1. Research Application and Funding

The aim of this course is to introduce the fellows to various sources of funding and types of grants, and to the art of grant writing, particularly focused on the K-award. The course is conducted in the Winter quarter each year. After an organizational session, each fellow presents either a research plan, a report of their ongoing research, or an idea for a grant application such as the K-award. At each presentation, the fellows and faculty offer constructive criticism of the plan, or the ongoing research. Hence, the seminar covers research design, issues of participant recruitment, entry characteristics, methodological issues, statistical issues, the presentation of study results and conclusions, all in ways directly relevant to a particular research topic. Fellows also gain skills in the presentation and interpretation of data. In addition, each fellow is exposed to a variety of different research topics and methods, and it is not unusual for collaborations between fellows to emerge from such presentations. 

2. Essential Methodological Topics in Clinical Research

We will cover several methodological topics clinical psychiatric researchers often find critical in conducting their everyday research. A presentation on each specific topic will be given first, followed by a session focusing on specific examples, hands-on experience and reviews of introductory and intermediate statistics topics. Topics include: hypothesis testing, effect size, statistical power, measurement and diagnosis including DSM-V, medical test evaluation and risk factor methodology.

3. Longitudinal Data Analysis

Most clinical trials are longitudinal in nature. Mixed effects type analyses have been increasingly used in analyzing data from longitudinal studies because of advantages such as better handling of missing data, interpretability, and statistical power. Focusing on mixed effects type analyses, this class will cover basics of longitudinal data analysis (with continuous and categorical outcomes) along with common issues that arise in longitudinal clinical studies, such as noncompliance, mediation, moderation, and causal inference. In terms of actual model estimation, we will first use a general statistical package (SPSS) for basic mixed effects modeling, and then will use a more specialized program (Mplus) as we deal with more complex longitudinal models.

4. Responsible Conduct of Research (MED 255)

The Responsible Conduct of Research course is designed to engage participants in productive discussions about ethical issues that are commonly encountered during their research careers. This course is required for graduate students and postdoctoral scholars who are supported by grants from the National Institutes of Health, and many departments and programs also recommend this course as part of their curricula.

5. Clinical Work

Fellows may devote up to 20% of their time assessing and conducting therapy with patients in one of the clinics within the Department of Psychiatry preferably related to their research topic.

Additional Seminars

Two more specialized seminars in statistics offered each year cover methodological issues in human genetic research and in neuropsychological research. 

PROGRAM FACULTY

W. Stewart Agras, M.D., Emeritus Professor of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences
Bruce Arnow, Ph.D., Professor of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Director, Psychosocial Treatment Clinic
Karl Deisseroth, M.D., Ph.D., Professor of Bioengineering and Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences
Amit Etkin, M.D., Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences
R. Christopher Hayward, M.D., MPH, Professor of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Chief of Hospital-based Services
Cheryl Gore-Felton, Ph.D., Professor of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences
Ian H. Gotlib, Ph.D., Professor of Psychology
James J. Gross, Ph.D., Professor of Psychology
Keith Humphreys, Ph.D., Professor of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences
Booil Jo, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences
Terence Ketter, M.D., Professor of Psychiatry, Chief, Bipolar Disorders Clinic
Helena C. Kraemer, Ph.D., Emeritus Professor of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences
Laura Lazzeroni, Ph.D., Associate Professor (Research) of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences
Robert C. Malenka, M.D., Ph.D., Professor of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences
Rachel Manber, Ph.D., Professor of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences
Natalie Rasgon, M.D., Ph.D., Professor of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences
Allan Reiss, M.D., Ph.D., Professor of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences
Alan F. Schatzberg, M.D., Professor of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences
David Spiegel, M.D., Professor of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences
Patricia Suppes, M.D., Ph.D., Professor of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences
C. Barr Taylor, M.D., Professor of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Emeritus, Director, Laboratory for the Study of Behavioral Medicine

APPLICATIONS

Stanford University Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences anticipates openings for post-doctoral fellows to begin 7/2014 and 9/2014 of the 2014-15 academic year. These positions are open to MDs and PhDs. Candidates must contact a program faculty member in their area of interest, above, or other faculty listed on our website (http://psychiatry.stanford.edu), before applying.

REQUIREMENTS

M.D. and M.D./Ph.D. applicants must have completed an approved residency program. PhD applicants must have completed: 1) an APA-accredited graduate program; 2) an APA-accredited internship; 3) all requirements for their Ph.D. prior to beginning their appointment. Applicants must be US citizens or permanent residents. 

TO APPLY

Email the following as PDF attachments to Connie Nelson (connie.nelson@stanford.edu): 1) a cover letter specifying research aims; 2) your CV; and 3) three letters of recommendation emailed as PDF attachments directly from your recommenders to Connie Nelson (connie.nelson@stanford.edu). (Questions: connie.nelson@stanford.edu) Minority candidates are strongly encouraged to apply.

Application deadline is January 3, 2014.

| Top |

Stanford Medicine Resources:

Footer Links: